Recommended Books June 2014

June 2014, Recommended Books

The Red Book: A Reader’s Edition

By C. G. Jung (Author), Sonu Shamdasani (Author), John Peck (Author), Mark Kyburz (Author)

The Red Book, published to wide acclaim in 2009, contains the nucleus of C.G. Jung’s later works. It was here that he developed his theories that would transform psychotherapy from treatment of the sick into a means for the higher development of the personality. As Sara Corbett wrote in The New York Times, “The creation of one of modern history’s true visionaries, The Red Book is a singular work, outside of categorization…it transcends the history of psychoanalysis and underscores Jung’s place among revolutionary thinkers like Marx, Orwell and, of course, Freud.” The Red Book: A Reader’s Edition features Sonu Shamdasani’s introductory essay and the full translation of Jung’s vital work in one volume.

 

Games People Play: The Psychology of Human Relationships

by Eric Berne

The bestselling Games People Play is the book that has helped millions of people understand the dynamics of relationships, by psychiatrist Eric Berne. We all play games. In every encounter with other people we are doing so. The nature of these games depends both on the situation and on who we meet. Eric Berne’s classic Games People Play is the most accessible and insightful book ever written about the games we play: those patterns of behaviour that reveal hidden feelings and emotions. Wise and witty, it shows the underlying motivations behind our relationships and explores the roles that we try to play – and are forced to play. Games People Play gives you the keys to unlock the psychology of others – and yourself. You’ll become more honest, more effective, and a true team player.

 

The Aleph and Other Stories

by Jorge Luis Borges

The Aleph and Other Stories is a book of short stories by Argentine writer Jorge Luis Borges. The title work, “The Aleph”, describes a point in space that contains all other spaces at once. The work also presents the idea of infinite time. Borges writes in the original afterword, dated May 3, 1949 (Buenos Aires), that most of the stories belong to the genre of fantasy, mentioning themes such as identity and immortality. Borges added four new stories to the collection in the 1952 edition, for which he provided a brief postscript to the afterword.